Ryujin Swords

Armour

If you need antique armour or fittings, or if you need armour professionally restored, contact me to discuss your requirements. We have the contacts to source what you need.

Reproduction Fittings for Katchu Yogu Style Armor

Agemakifusa, large, for the back of the armour. Made from Japanese silk. Can be made to your own colour. £135.30

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Agemakifusa, medium, for the back of a child's armour. Made from Japanese silk. Can be made to your own colour. £84.14

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Agemakifusa, small, for the mune or kabuto (helmet). Made from Japanese silk. Can be made to your own colour. £45.74

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Maruhimo, silk. Available in three sizes: thick (8 mm), medium (4.5 mm) and thin (3 mm). 5 metres.

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Mimi-ito, silk, in 6mm, 8mm and 10 mm width, 10 metres. Hand-woven to order in 2 colours.

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Mimi-ito, silk, in 6mm, 8mm and 10 mm width, 10 metres. Hand-woven to order in 3 colours.

Please enter your choice of colours:



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Mimi-ito, silk, in 6mm, 8mm and 10 mm width, 10 metres. Woven to order in 4 colours.

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Odoshi-ito, silk, 10 mm wide. Used for lacing parts of the armour together. Usually sold in 10m and 20m lengths, but other lengths available on request. £18.18/metre




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Length in metres

Odoshi-ito, silk, 8 mm wide. Used for lacing parts of the armour together. Usually sold in 10m and 20m lengths, but other lengths available on request. £17.55/metre

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Length in metres

Odoshi-ito, silk, 6 mm wide. Used for lacing parts of the armour together. Usually sold in 10m and 20m lengths, but other lengths available on request. £16.50/metre

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Length in metres

Sodefusa, silk. Available with one tassel and loop (mimi) or two tassels.


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Kohaze. Sold in pairs and available in two sizes: large (41 mm) and small (30 mm). Plastic.

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Hassokanagu for do. Three pieces.£68.30



Hassokanagu for sode. Three pieces. £70.94

Himawarimon. Available in three sizes: large (4.5 cm), medium (3 cm) and small (1.8 cm).

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Kougai kantsuki. One pair. £176.25





Hachimanza. Accessory for the top of the kabuto (helmet). £200.95


Sekan zatsuki. £140.70



Kabutokan. £44.08


Munekan. £46.18


Hoshibyo, 6 mm. £12.84


Kikubyo, 10.5 mm.£14.60


Egawa, blue, approx 70 cm x 70 cm. Click on the picture for more detail. £142.36


Egawa, tan, approx 70 cm x 70 cm. Click on the picture for more detail. DISCONTINUED


Fusegumi, 3mm. In ivory, light green and dark blue only, as per illustration. 5 metres. £61.42



Antique Armour and Fittings

An 18th century jingasa of the bajo-gasa or riding cap type. Bajo-gasa were typically very high quality, because it was exceptional and expensive to be able to afford a horse. The jingasa is covered in black lacquer and adorned with two golden cranes, floral designs and a large mon (family/clan crest) on the front. The interior features red lacquer with gold specks, and seven metal rings for secure fastening. There are multiple cracks in the lacquer and some pieces have chipped off (mostly around the brim and one part on the top), but it is otherwise in remarkable condition considering its age and function. Dimensions are approx. 14 inches (355.6 mm) x 12 inches (304.8 mm) x 5 inches (127.00 mm) high.

Currently being restored.


An Edo period katabira or armoured jacket, probably 18th or early 19th century. These were used as emergency armour, when there was insufficient time for a samurai to put put on full armour, under full armour as additional protection, or as light armour when travelling, possibly under a kimono, in case of ambush by bandits. Katabira were also used as light armour for troops. No doubt ronin or samurai prone to duelling might also wear one of these. The armour could be considered a form of brigandine.

Most katabira use kusari (chainmail). This one is very unusual in that it uses kikko (hexagonal plates) of hardened leather stitched between the inner and outer layers of Japanese hemp (asa). Katabira with leather kikko are rarely seen. Hardened leather is considerably lighter than the alternative of iron kikko or kusari. It is also surprisingly resistant to being cut, even when applying pressure with a craft knife such as a Stanley blade. Hardened leather kikko therefore provided good protection against sword cuts whilst maintaining manoueverability. Everything else was down to skill.

The outer fabric is dyed with Japanese indigo whilst the liner is undyed. The kohaze are of water buffalo horn. The neck and arm holes are edged with egawa which has been hand-printed in the traditional manner. Although originally in good condition, the katabira has been professionally restored by a Japanese-trained armourer. Fits chest size 34"-36". SOLD



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